Print this page

Pleasanton sketch

PRT (personal rapid transit) is an electric, 200-mpg-equivalent, elevated transit system with many 4-person vehicles. First deployment of the ULTra PRT system is scheduled for London Heathrow Airport in 2010, to serve Heathrow's new Terminal 5. Working as circulator transit for office parks, airports, universities, and other major activity centers, PRT is faster than a car. In these applications, PRT makes carpooling and transit more effective, by solving the "last mile problem." PRT also enables longer bike commutes and shopping trips. An introductory 3-minute PRT youtube video can be found at: http://www.ultraprt.net/cms

Proposed is a 47-station, 15 mile one-way guideway PRT system for Pleasanton's Hacienda Business Park (HBP) major activity center and surrounding area:

HBP is a twenty-year-old, 9.6-million square foot, 875-acre mixed-use office park, located in the city of Pleasanton, within Alameda County, CA. In the Figure above, PRT stations 1-36 encompass HBP. Stations 37-47 comprise the East Dublin BART transit village. HBP is located near the intersection of two interstate highways: I580 and I680. There are currently 19,000 workers, with plans for 27,000 within a few years. Most workers are college educated "knowledge workers" employed in computer, communications, financial, bioscience, or medical fields. There are 3,500 residents, with planning efforts under way to add as many as 1,200 additional housing units. Initial studies have shown the park could accommodate 2,400 or more additional units.

HBP also has four hotels (see stations labeled: S2, S10, S12), four retail shopping centers (S8, S9, S31, and east and across the street from S20), and a middle school (S18). The BART Dublin/Pleasanton station is located at the Northern edge of the office park and is the
eastern terminus of BART's blue line (S3, S4). Five-story campus buildings abut the BART station, with two-story buildings located on the periphery. A proposed expansion program, the HBP Specific Plan, is undergoing government review. Compared to single use office parks, HBP has a comparatively rich mix of uses (office, hotel, retail, residential, and recreation). Three flood control canals cross HBP: Chabot (parallel to and East of Chabot Drive), Arroyo Mocho Canal (parallel to and South of West Las Positas Boulevard), and Tassajara Canal (forking in a Northeasterly direction
from Arroyo Mocho Canal, just southeast of S17).

DETAILS:

Hacienda Business Park study (Transforming Office Parks into Transit Villages) web site: http://tod.hacienda.org/PRT/epa.htm

TITLE: Major Activity Center PRT Circulator Design: Hacienda Business Park

ABSTRACT:The design of a comprehensive mobility system for a suburban San Francisco East Bay Area office park exposes a number of new transit circulator implementation challenges. Original system design perspectives are provided regarding:

  • "Horizontal mixed use" and how resident out-commuters will generate more trips than employee in-commuters. 
  • Line haul transit capacity constraints loom as an obstacle to rapid spread of PRT circulators
  • PRT station placement challenges with office park "superblocks"
  • Design methodology to allocate PRT stations to workers and residents
  • Ideal office park characteristics for PRT alignments
  • Problems with generating too much PRT circulator ridership solved by semi-independent loops
  • Multimodal transit hubs at the edges of the PRT alignment 
  • PRT alignment "style choices"
  • The need for folding grocery carts (and other solutions) when the car is left at home

 

Full Paper: http://www.cities21.org/TRB_PRT_HBP.pdf